Small enrico teotti Enrico Teotti on

Enrico Teotti (Senior Software Developer, XO Group, Inc.) walks us through how he recently leveraged Rails engines to separate the public from the administration portion of a web application and deploy them to different servers leveraging feature flags.

18:14

The talk was hosted by NYC.rb and given at Pivotal Labs.

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Small andrew Andrew Geweke on

The last few years have seen an explosion of interest in NoSQL data-storage layers, and then some retrenchment as the limitations of these systems became increasingly apparent. (It turns out they’re not magic, after all!) Today we seem faced with a choice. On one hand, we can reach for some of the potential “big wins” of NoSQL systems, but many of them are still relatively immature — at least when compared to the RDBMS — and the things we give up (transactionality, durability, manageability) we often discover to be very painful losses. On the other hand, we can reach for the security of a traditional RDBMS; we get incredibly well-understood, robust, durable, manageable systems…but we often sacrifice a lot of potential future growth.

In this talk given at the San Francisco Ruby on Rails Group, Andrew Geweke shows you how to have some of your cake and eat some of it, too. He introduces a combination of architectural patterns and software (including two brand-new RubyGems) that let you build schema-free, scalable data storage inside a traditional RDBMS, and shows you how just changing your deployment options lets you scale the same codebase and database design from a site that’s just barely getting started to one under extremely high load. These are the same techniques used by sites like Scribd, which happily serve dozens of pages per second from a RDBMS. These techniques also open up an easy migration path for you to move appropriate data sets to a NoSQL system when desired, allowing you to form a “blended” system that gives you the best of both worlds.

23:18

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Small whaples Thomas Whaples on

Shutterstock developers pay a lot of attention to the user experience of our website. We have a fleet of User Experience experts who help make sure the error states our web application shows to customers are useful and actionable.

But when we’re building backend APIs instead of HTML forms, that experience doesn’t translate. What’s the equivalent of this, in an API?

validation


The Shutterstock Contributor Team has been building our next-generation content-review system, so that we can scale our image-review operation. We’re building it in a service-oriented fashion, in Ruby, with DataMapper as an ORM.

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Small 5e6ceef905d14ade228ea22c445d57bc Aidan Feldman on

While building Jux.com, there was a need for applying transformations and effects to images in a way that would work across devices.  The Magickly app was built as a stateless image effects API.  To demonstrate its flexibility, the app was converted into a gem and used to power Mustachio - better known as mustachify.me.  In this talk, Aidan Feldman, education hacker at Github, will cover some of the architecture decisions for Magickly, some fun findings about ImageMagick, and the internals of both gems. This talk was recorded at the Anatomy of a Ruby Gem meetup at Artsy.

49:47

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Small 2c1a10ad0cce0f73e11a2a558a69f97c James Rosen on

Three exciting talks in this video: First Ben McRedmond will share his experiences with machine learning and go over some simple concepts (and practical details) which most web developers will benefit from knowing. In the second talk, James Rosen will talk about ways to make it simple for web developers to access front-end libraries at the HTTP layer for a faster and more automated development process. In the third talk Rudy Rigot, from prismic.io, will share his painful past experiences around manageable content, and will share his critical look on the various ways developers handle it today in their applications. These talks were recorded at the SF Ruby on Rails meetup group at Zendesk.

01:02:03

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Small russ Russell Taga on

sfrails meetup
This talk was recorded at the SF Ruby on Rails meetup at The Climate Corporation last week. Russell Taga talks to us about Internationalization and localization with Rails and what they learned during their initial push into Europe at Hotel Tonight.


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Small p1010011 2 Jeff Scheur on

sfrails meetup
This talk was recorded at the SF Ruby on Rails meetup at The Climate Corporation last week. Jeff Scheur will give a lightning talk on what he's learned developing an educational site that teaches students grammar/writing skills. He'll share insights on how to avoid pitfalls in ed-tech that get the better of many engineers and discuss what technological advances make him hopeful for the future of education.

How to Engineer Products for Students and Teachers — Winning in Ed-Tech

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Small 66c680f88e8c379fe408d32299dfb4e6 Jim Jones on

Today we have a talk from one of the NYC on Rails meetup where Jim Jones,  Software Engineer at Zvent and creator of the Turkee Gem, discussed integrating Amazon Mechanical Turk with Rails.

Amazon's Mechanical Turk has long been used for scientific surveys and image classification. But it has a much greater potential. We'll explore the creative possibilities of Mechanical Turk including story creation, testimonials, production descriptions, and the testing of product ideas.  I will demonstrate the basics of the service that will allow you to begin testing and iterating on ideas quickly. We'll conclude the presentation by showing an advanced example of integrating with Rails and Mechanical Turk utilizing the Turkee gem. Mechanical Turk could quickly become your swiss army knife for getting your project off the ground.

The Levo League hosted the latest NYC on Rails meetup where Jim Jones,  Software Engineer at Zvent and creator of the Turkee Gem, talked about integrating Amazon Mechanical Turk with Rails.

Amazon's Mechanical Turk has long been used for scientific surveys and image classification. But it has a much greater potential. We'll explore the creative possibilities of Mechanical Turk including story creation, testimonials, production descriptions, and the testing of product ideas.  I will demonstrate the basics of the service that will allow you to begin testing and iterating on ideas quickly. We'll conclude the presentation by showing an advanced example of integrating with Rails and Mechanical Turk utilizing the Turkee gem. Mechanical Turk could quickly become your swiss army knife for getting your project off the ground.

Slides: http://www.slideshare.net/JimJones2

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