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Beyang Liu will provide a recap of the GopherCon conference from early July. He'll highlight the top speakers and talks and relay the latest news.

Looking to meet other awesome gophers or learn Go? Tell us who you're looking for here and we will introduce you to the right developer.

About the Speaker
Beyang Liu is a programmer who likes building products that help people be better creators. He likes learning about language and vision systems, both human and computer. Before co-founding Sourcegraph, he worked on data analysis and visualization at Palantir and researched computer vision algorithms in Professor Daphne Koller's lab at Stanford.

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Dave Cheney Dave Cheney on

In this talk Dave Cheney will talk about gb, a new build tool that uses a project-based approach to building, testing, and dependency management. The key idea to the approach is that we want to divide the repeatable builds via source vendoring, and this is important because it's vendoring without rewriting reports. gb is a Set of rewritable components, and you have a set of libraries that lets you build Go code directly. Its two main differences is that gb is not a wrapper around the go tool and it doesn't have to use $GOPATH.

More in the talk:

NEW! Looking to meet other gophers or learn Go? Tell us who you're looking for here and our Matchbot will introduce you to the right developer from community.

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Gccgo, more known as "the other Go compiler",  is a Go compiler that leverages gcc for its compilation power, things like automatization and code generation. It was written by Ian Lance Taylor and released in November 2009 and is  still maintained by him.

There is not much general info on gccgo, and not a lot of people know why it exists or why it's actually useful.

Chris Manghane from the core Go language team at Google will give a brief history of gccgo, talk about the current work being done to stay compatible, and a look at future possibilities.

NEW! Looking to meet other gophers or learn Go? Tell us who you're looking for here and our Matchbot will introduce you to the right developer from community.

Slides:
http://go-talks.appspot.com/github.com/paranoiacblack/slides/keeping_up.slide#2

About the Speaker

Chris Manghane works on the core Go language team at Google on the compilers and tool chains. Specifically, he works on gccgo with Ian Lance Taylor.

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Unknown author on

Go was designed to build network services and as a consequence we have a rich ecosystem of RPC options at our disposal. This includes REST with HTTP+JSON, raw protobufs sent over tcp, or new entries like grpc and capnproto. This talk will explore popular options and considerations like interoperability, client generation, memory consumption, authentication, and encryption.

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Andrew Gerrand Andrew Gerrand on

In this talk Andrew Gerrand discusses the state of Go; what's happening in the Go core in the lead up to Go 1.5.

Full list of all GopherFest 2015 videos here

Among the major changes are the conversion of the tool chain from C to Go, a new concurrent garbage collector, new tools for tracing and program analysis, and support for Go on Android and iOS.

More in the video:

This video was recorded at the GoSF meetup at New Relic.

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Evan Owen, Director of Engineering at Cotap, shares why they chose Go for low-latency processing and delivery of user-generated media content between mobile messaging clients. The challenges they faced prompted Evan to choose Go, specifically for the Groupcache library developed at Google. His talk introduces distributed caching using Groupcache in single and multi-layer configurations, working with images and media in-memory, as well as some insights into the world of cgo.

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Paul Dix Paul Dix on

Over the past 4 months, Paul Dix and his team completely rewrote InfluxDB: from Go to Go. In this talk, he gives a quick overview of InfluxDB and shows how it's useful for metrics, analytics, and sensor data.

Paul also dives into the history of the project and why they chose to rewrite their previous Go implementation into the implementation they have now. He shows pain points with their legacy codebase and gives examples of how rewriting the code from scratch gave them the ability to do things they couldn't have done otherwise.

Paul closes out with some comparisons on usability, readability, and performance of the previous version against the new rewritten version.

31:34

This video was recorded at the GoSF meetup at Chain in SF.

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Unknown author on

GopherJS is a compiler from Go to JavaScript. By now, it supports "nearly everything," including goroutines. It provides an opportunity to write front-end code in Go which will run in all browsers, enabling you to share data structures, code, and libraries from your back-end Go code, with benefits of having gofmt/goimports, godoc, static type checking, and helpful compilation error messages.

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Robert Winslow Robert Winslow on

Robert Winslow talks about FlatBuffers, an efficient cross platform serialization library for C++, Java, C#, and Go. It was created at Google specifically for game development and other performance-critical applications. It provides access to serialized data without parsing/unpacking, while also still supporting data structure evolution (forwards/backwards compatibility).

31:58

Winslow is a consulting CTO to early stage startups. "I like math, long walks on the beach, and large markets."

This video was recorded at the GoSF meetup at Galvanize in SF.

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Ted Kornish (engineer) and Ryan Atallah (co-founder) from Arktos talk about the considerations in creating a Go codebase that's built to last. Specifically, how to keep your codebase type safe and maintainable. It may take more consideration from the start, but infrastructure is an investment in the future that will let you spend less time debugging and more time developing features. Ted and Ryan walk through how to invest in your infrastructure by making your Go codebase extendable, DRY, type safe, testable and with minimal code bottlenecks.

Slides available here.

This talk was given at the GoSF meetup at New Relic.

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Ben Sigelman Ben Sigelman on

Building large-scale distributed systems is a challenge in any language: what about Go makes distributed system-building easier, what makes it harder, and what won't work at all? Former Google software engineer Ben Sigelman answers these questions in his talk about creating distributed systems in Go. He also addresses the fundamentals of healthy distributed systems and the joys and pitfalls of building them in Go.

40:09

View Ben's slides here.

This talk was given at the GoSF meetup at Pivotal.

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Kyle Dinh Kyle Dinh on

Full-stack developer Kyle Dinh talks about how to use AngularJS + Go. He explains the tools he uses and how he organizes his projects: Angular to build the front end and Go as a RESTful API server.

In this talk, Kyle walks through how he uses:


  • Vagrant to build an Ubuntu dev instance

  • Grunt/NodeJS to build the Angular front end

  • Grunt to admin the Postgres DB

  • Grunt to run Go unit tests and Selenium tests


27:16

This talk was recorded at the GoSF meetup at Thumbtack.

Code from the talk here

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Beyang Liu Beyang Liu on

Web apps need to be generally three things: functional, performant, and have a good API to interact with it. Beyang Liu of Sourcegraph talks about the D.R.Y method (Don’t Repeat Yourself) and shares lessons learned while building their Go app.

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Oleg Shaldybin Oleg Shaldybin on

Go is prone to memory leaks just like with Java, Ruby, and other garbage-collected languages. Software Engineer Oleg Shaldybin from Apcera details methods for detecting, measuring the impact of, and eliminating leaks.

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Andrew Gerrand Andrew Gerrand on

Andrew Gerrand is an engineer at Google that works on GoLang. In his Gopher SummerFest talk, he takes us through Go’s timeline - where the language was yesterday, where it is today, and what is planned for the future (including the history of the Gopher logo and plans for Go 1.4!).

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Derek Collison Derek Collison on

In 2012, Derek Collison (Founder and CEO, Apcera) predicted that “Go will become the dominant language for systems work in IaaS Orchestration, and PaaS in 24 months.” Today, he feels his prediction wasn’t too far off.

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Alan Shreve Alan Shreve on

In this talk, Alan Shreve will begin by talking about decentralizing the web, but then he will talk about stream multiplexing in Go as a foundation for RPC. Specifically, he'll cover the Muxado library he built for this purpose (https://github.com/inconshreveable/muxado). Alan will explain how muxado makes a great building block for custom protocols and RPC, outline the design of the public API, and go over some of the clever tricks employed in the implementation to make muxado fast. This talk was recorded at the GoSF meetup at Heroku.

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Niklas Nielsen Niklas Nielsen on

In this talk, Niklas Nielsen from Mesosphere, talks about Apache Mesos, a cluster manager that provides efficient resource isolation and sharing across distributed applications or frameworks. In this talk, Niklas will go over how to write frameworks for Apache Mesos in Go. It can run Apache Hadoop, MPI, Hypertable, Apache Spark, Storm, Chronos, Marathon, and other applications on a dynamically shared pool of nodes. The biggest user of Mesos is Twitter, where it runs on thousands of servers. Airbnb runs all of their data infrastructure on it, processing petabytes of data. This talk was recorded at the GoSF meetup at Heroku.

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Keith Rarick Keith Rarick on

In this talk, Keith Rarick, formerly of Heroku, gives a brief overview on the state of dependency management tools for Go applications. He then provides a detailed run-through of godep, including initial setup, collaboration, updating dependency packages and working with third party tools. Keith also runs through deploying to Heroku, as well as godep's general philosophy of operation, specifically, why it works and the way it works.  This talk was recorded at the GoSF meetup at Heroku.

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Brandon Philips Brandon Philips on

Brandon Philips, of CoreOS, will talk about etcd, a highly-available key/value store, and how it was built with and can be used from Go. He'll cover the basics of running an etcd cluster and the underlying consensus algorithm called raft. He'll also get into a practical use case for service discovery and shared configuration and wrap with how you can use etcd from your Go programs using go-etcd. This talk was recorded at the GoSF meetup at Pivotal Labs.

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Richard Crowley Richard Crowley on

In this talk, Richard Crowley will discuss language features plus standard library and third-party packages that he uses at Betable to build scalable web services in Go. He'll talk about the strengths and weaknesses of the standard net/http package along with how they added third-party packages to shore up these weaknesses. He’ll also discuss JSON and its relationship with Go data structures, Go’s excellent support for reflection, and how to use it to create safe APIs. Richard will finish up by talking about logging and metric collection. (Much of what he'll cover is recently open-source as part of Tiger Tonic.) This talk was recorded at the GoSF meetup at Pivotal Labs.

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Al Tobey Al Tobey on

Two exciting talks on Cassandra and Go in this video! In the first talk, Kyle Kingsbury, who has tested Cassandra's behavior with respect to consistency, isolation, and transactions as part of the Jepsen project to educate users about distributed consensus, shares his surprising test results. In the second talk, Al Tobey, Open Source Mechanic at DataStax presents a brief introduction to Go and Cassandra, explaining how they are a great fit for each other using code samples and a live demo. These talks were recorded at the DataStax Cassandra SF Users meetup at Disqus.

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Sam Helman Sam Helman on

In this talk, we'll hear from Sam Helman, Software Engineer at MongoDB (formerly 10gen), on how MongoDB is integrating Go into their new and existing cloud tools. Some of the tools leveraging Go include the backup capabilities in MongoDB Management Service and a continuous integration tool.  They see using Go as an opportunity to experiment with new technologies and create a better product for end users. This talk was recorded at the MongoDB User Group meetup at MongoDB.

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