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Beyang Liu will provide a recap of the GopherCon conference from early July. He'll highlight the top speakers and talks and relay the latest news.

Looking to meet other awesome gophers or learn Go? Tell us who you're looking for here and we will introduce you to the right developer.

About the Speaker
Beyang Liu is a programmer who likes building products that help people be better creators. He likes learning about language and vision systems, both human and computer. Before co-founding Sourcegraph, he worked on data analysis and visualization at Palantir and researched computer vision algorithms in Professor Daphne Koller's lab at Stanford.

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In this talk Dave Cheney will talk about gb, a new build tool that uses a project-based approach to building, testing, and dependency management. The key idea to the approach is that we want to divide the repeatable builds via source vendoring, and this is important because it's vendoring without rewriting reports. gb is a Set of rewritable components, and you have a set of libraries that lets you build Go code directly. Its two main differences is that gb is not a wrapper around the go tool and it doesn't have to use $GOPATH.

More in the talk:

NEW! Looking to meet other gophers or learn Go? Tell us who you're looking for here and our Matchbot will introduce you to the right developer from community.

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Gccgo, more known as "the other Go compiler",  is a Go compiler that leverages gcc for its compilation power, things like automatization and code generation. It was written by Ian Lance Taylor and released in November 2009 and is  still maintained by him.

There is not much general info on gccgo, and not a lot of people know why it exists or why it's actually useful.

Chris Manghane from the core Go language team at Google will give a brief history of gccgo, talk about the current work being done to stay compatible, and a look at future possibilities.

NEW! Looking to meet other gophers or learn Go? Tell us who you're looking for here and our Matchbot will introduce you to the right developer from community.

Slides:
http://go-talks.appspot.com/github.com/paranoiacblack/slides/keeping_up.slide#2

About the Speaker

Chris Manghane works on the core Go language team at Google on the compilers and tool chains. Specifically, he works on gccgo with Ian Lance Taylor.

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Go was designed to build network services and as a consequence we have a rich ecosystem of RPC options at our disposal. This includes REST with HTTP+JSON, raw protobufs sent over tcp, or new entries like grpc and capnproto. This talk will explore popular options and considerations like interoperability, client generation, memory consumption, authentication, and encryption.

About the Speaker
Jonathan Boulle is a Technical Product Lead at CoreOS. He works on all things containers at CoreOS, driving the App Container specification and development of rkt, the application container runtime. Previously he was one of the lead engineers on fleet, contributed heavily to etcd, and, in a past life, worked on Twitter's cluster management platform based on Aurora and Mesos. He's passionate about Linux, golang, F/OSS, the Oxford comma, and scale.

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In this talk Andrew Gerrand discusses the state of Go; what's happening in the Go core in the lead up to Go 1.5.

Full list of all GopherFest 2015 videos here

Among the major changes are the conversion of the tool chain from C to Go, a new concurrent garbage collector, new tools for tracing and program analysis, and support for Go on Android and iOS.

More in the video:

This video was recorded at the GoSF meetup at New Relic.

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1. The State of Go


Andrew Gerrand on where the language came from and where it's going.


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2. Distributed Systems in Go: The Good, The Bad, and The Otherwise


What about Go makes distributed system-building easier, what makes it harder, and what won't work at all.


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3. How to Make Your Statistical Programs More Scalable With Go


How to use Go for statistics.


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4. Optimizing Go: from 3K requests/sec to 480K requests/sec


A high-level journey in optimizing a Go program from processing 3k requests/core to processing 480k requests/core.


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5. Getting started with GopherJS


An introduction to the go compiler for Javascript.


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6. Building Distributed Systems with Go and Mesos


How to write frameworks for Apache Mesos in Go

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7. Building Web Services in Go


Language features, standard libraries and third-party packages used to build scalable web services in Go.

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8. Scaling a Go Codebase


The considerations in creating a Go codebase that's built to last.

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9. A Tour of Cryptography Packages in Go


A full tour of cryptography packages in Go

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10. The Nature of Constants in Go


The real nature of constants and how they give this type safe language the flexibility to work with different kinds of data values.

See full post...

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Evan Owen, Director of Engineering at Cotap, shares why they chose Go for low-latency processing and delivery of user-generated media content between mobile messaging clients. The challenges they faced prompted Evan to choose Go, specifically for the Groupcache library developed at Google. His talk introduces distributed caching using Groupcache in single and multi-layer configurations, working with images and media in-memory, as well as some insights into the world of cgo.

This video was recorded at the GoSF meetup at Thumbtack in SF.

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Mohit Gupta and Alex Zylman from Clever introduce Sphinx, a high-performance rate limiter built in Go as a case study. Highlights include:

* Collaborating on a code base by defining interfaces
* How interfaces allow trivially adding dynamic configuration reload in a few lines of code
* Providing multiple, swappable backends with different functionality
* Where to use Go’s benchmarking library, and where it’s not enough

This video was recorded at the GoSF meetup at Galvanize in SF.

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